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ALIA Summer Leadership Intensive

Early Bird Pricing Ends On Sunday!

Limited Tickets REGISTER HERE

Strengthen your capacity to lead fearlessly in challenging situations
Participate in a powerful learning community
Experience “deep dive” modules with diverse, world-class faculty

Faculty & Special Guest

Aftab Erfan, Ph.D.

Aftab Erfan, Ph.D.

Working With Differences: The Deep Democracy Approach

View Module

Director of Dialogue and Conflict Engagement, University of British Columbia, and senior practitioner of Deep Democracy.

Gaylon Ferguson, Ph.D.

Gaylon Ferguson, Ph.D.

Courageous Leadership Training

View Module

Faculty, Naropa University; Author Natural Bravery: Fear and Fearlessness as the Direct Path of Awakening.

Arawana Hayashi

Arawana Hayashi

Exploring Diversity Using Social Presencing Theater

View Module

Co-founder of the Presencing Institute and creator of Social Presencing Theatre

Leticia Nieto, Psy.D.

Leticia Nieto, Psy.D.

Not All Differences Are Equal

View Module

Psychotherapist, dramatist, educator, and author of Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment

Susan Skjei, Ph.D.

Susan Skjei, Ph.D.

Creating a Culture of Mindfulness and Inclusivity in Your Organization

View Module

Experienced executive, consultant, and coach; Director of the Authentic Leadership Center, Naropa University

Adam Kahane *

Adam Kahane *

Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don’t Agree with or Like or Trust

View Presentation
* Special Guest

Director of Reos Partners and author of Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don’t Agree With or Like or Trust

Engaging the differences that divide us

Together, at this three-day ALIA Leadership Intensive, we can learn how to engage with difference and, in doing so, better engage the wisdom in our groups or organizations.

Difference can stimulate creativity and the kind of breakthrough innovation organizations need to address today’s challenges. The best decisions happen when differences are included, valued and worked with effectively.

However, differences can also activate exclusion, defensiveness, and aggression in ourselves and others. These reactions block clear thinking and skillful action. Over time this pattern hardens us from the inside out and can create serious dysfunction in a team, organization or community.

Whether we work in corporations, governments, nonprofits or schools, we inevitably encounter strong differences.

How can we appreciate differences without seeking to change others or have the differences divide us?

How can we work together in the midst of disagreement?

How can we use our differences to make us stronger and more creative?

If you are looking for a better way, and are daring enough to explore new practices, please join us.

Discover more about the Intensive

Who Attends an Intensive?

 
The Intensive is for experienced and emerging leaders and change agents in business, education health care, government and nonprofits. We join with leaders who want to create healthy and resilient organization and communities that cultivate authenticity, collaboration, innovation, joy and effectiveness as they engage in the complex issues of our time.

Who Attends an Intensive?

 
The Intensive is for experienced and emerging leaders and change agents in business, education health care, government and nonprofits. We join with leaders who want to create healthy and resilient organization and communities that cultivate authenticity, collaboration, innovation, joy and effectiveness as they engage in the complex issues of our time.

Who Attends an Intensive?

 
The Intensive is for experienced and emerging leaders and change agents in business, education health care, government and nonprofits. We join with leaders who want to create healthy and resilient organization and communities that cultivate authenticity, collaboration, innovation, joy and effectiveness as they engage in the complex issues of our time.

What is an Intensive Like?

A Safe and Challenging Space

You will find a safe yet challenging place to stretch your way of thinking and open to possibilities for leading with more success in your organization. The curriculum is leading-edge, deeply personal and highly engaging. This unique leadership development experience not only expands your thinking and skills, but also connects you to a talented network of professionals.

Brings Together Expertise and Proven Methodologies

The intensive brings together expertise in the practices of conflict engagement and resolution, authentic leadership, and mindfulness. Drawing from proven methodologies, the seasoned faculty team brings a multi-faceted approach to engaging with differences. Far from just adding another “tool in your toolbox,” this event is intentionally designed to work at a deeper level of thinking and acting in the world.

A Non-traditional Learning Focus

Current research concludes what many of us intuitively know—that traditional leadership programs fall short because they place “too much focus on delivering information and content and not enough on the hard work of developing the leaders themselves” (Nick Petrie, Center for Creative Leadership, 2013).

A Learning Process with Years of Experience

For 17 years, ALIA Summer Leadership Intensive has been ahead of the curve, integrating mindfulness, creative process, and systems thinking into an integrative model of authentic leadership development. Authentic Leadership In Action, ALIA, is part of the Authentic Leadership Center at Naropa University.

“I attended the ALIA learning journeys for over ten years. The ultimate outcome of the ALIA Learning experience, for me, has been to make me a better person, a better, more open-minded consultant to explore the world of public organizations and somehow to help make them better for the citizens they serve.”

Dan Normandeau

President, ConversArt Consulting Ltd.

Pricing & Registration

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Through May 1

Early Bird Special

$895

Through June 15

Full Price

$995

Through June 22

Last Minute Price

$1050

Faculty & Module Details

Aftab Erfan, Ph.D.

Aftab Erfan, Ph.D.

Director of Dialogue and Conflict Engagement, University of British Columbia, and senior practitioner of Deep Democracy

Module » Working With Differences: The Deep Democracy Approach

Deep Democracy offers a practical approach for working with groups and individuals as a facilitator, mediator, coach or leader. It is “democratic” because it emphasizes that every voice matters and that decisions are wisest when majority and minority voices are both valued. It is “deep” because it goes far beyond engagement with ideas and instead surfaces emotions, intuitions, attachments, and identifies issues that make a conversation more honest and real. Based in process-oriented psychology and developed in the tension-ridden context of post-apartheid South Africa, Deep Democracy has been specifically customized to meet some of the most common challenges faced in any modern organizational and personal life. Its many applications are used today worldwide by leaders, managers, consultants, facilitators, coaches, family members, teachers and community activists.

Participants will experience a mixture of short lectures and group exercises that make the concepts of Deep Democracy relevant to the participants’ experience. They will gain a unique lens for looking at differences and some basic tools for working across differences or helping others resolve their conflicts. While Deep Democracy is primarily a verbal, language-based method, it also draws heavily on visual and somatic resources for conveying information and moving through conflict.

The Deep Democracy method is distinct from many other approaches in its orientation towards tension and conflict. Deep Democracy recognizes that when different voices come into conversation with each other there will inevitably be differences of opinion. This is the gift of diversity, and its challenge. Deep Democracy outlines a structured way of leading people into tensions and potential conflicts, knowing that innovative solutions, sustainable decisions, wisdom and transformational growth lie in that exploration. In this way the method allows us to engage the differences that divide us and unearth the “gold of conflict.”

Participant will learn to:

  • Distinguish between disagreement, conflict and abuse and the relevance of these concepts to diversity
  • Read the fabric of a group using a complexity science perspective, and become alert to signs of conflict escalation
  • Use a set of four steps and a movement-based approach for facilitating conversation that is oriented to dissent and engagement of voices from the margins
  • Put in practice a structured process for diving into a polarity and engaging with conflict in pairs, small and large groups

Aftab Erfan, PH.D.

Aftab Erfan is a scholar-practitioner and the Director of Dialogue and Conflict Engagement at the University of British Columbia. She lives in Vancouver, Canada as a settler and as an immigrant, originally from Iran. She studied fine arts, environmental sciences, and urban planning, but much of her growing-up years were spent as an activist in the youth environmental movement, where she also became aware of social justice issues and the difficulties of working across socio-cultural, economic, racial, religious, sexuality and gender divides.

Aftab also grew up in the ALIA community and was a regular program participant throughout her 20s and a member of the ALIA Governing Council from 2008 to 2011. She met many of her colleagues and mentors through ALIA, including Myrna Lewis, a South African psychologist and the founder of the Lewis Method of Deep Democracy. Aftab was hooked on Deep Democracy soon after and has over a period of 10 years become a senior practitioner and instructor in the method.

Her PhD dissertation is based on a one of a kind action research effort that applied the method of Deep Democracy within a small conflicted First Nation community on Vancouver Island. She has published many papers and book chapters and has consulted to numerous private, public and not-for-profit organizations that are finding better ways to work across difference and use conflict as fuel for transformation.

Gaylon Ferguson, Ph.D.

Gaylon Ferguson, Ph.D.

Faculty, Naropa University; Author Natural Bravery: Fear and Fearlessness as the Direct Path of Awakening

Module » Courageous Leadership Training

We live in fearful times. Since the catastrophic events of 9/11, we have seen the arising of a culture and politics of fear. Fear of the global consequences of climate change–and the denial of this threat to life on our planet–now feels familiar. The recent presidential campaign in the United States traded extensively in xenophobia, Islamophobia, misogyny, homophobia, and white supremacy.

What is to be done? Bravery becomes essential to effective leadership in such times. Cultivating fearlessness begins with being brave enough to experience our own fear and our vulnerability as human beings. As well, extending ourselves to others– those like and unlike ourselves–involves daring, being brave enough to feel the fundamental goodness of others. Finally, we will uncover the courage to manifest and catalyze the wisdom inherent in any group, organization, or community.

As Brene Brown suggests: “A leader is anyone who holds her or himself accountable for finding the potential in people and processes. Leadership has nothing to do with position, salary, direct reports, or status anymore. There are leaders at every level of organizations, schools, and communities who, every day, are defining strategy and shaping culture.”

This module in cultivating engaged courage includes practices of embodied presence, compassion and dialogue. In four linked sets of contemplative practices, we will directly explore our experiential answers to the question: What does leading with spacious confidence feel like?

Participants will learn to:

  • Practice embodied leadership as caring for the whole field
  • Engage our fear of difference and conflict by using embodied contemplations and movement exercises
  • Experience the social field and then move toward co-creatively manifesting from that field
  • Discover the courage that comes from inherent confidence

Gaylon Ferguson, PhD

Gaylon Ferguson is Core Faculty at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. He received a doctorate in cultural anthropology from Stanford where he was Fulbright Fellow to Nigeria, after which he taught at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author of two books: Natural Bravery: Fear and Fearlessness as Direct Path of Awakening and Natural Wakefulness: Discovering the Wisdom We Were Born With.

He has led group retreats in mindfulness-awareness meditation for 40 years. He is an Acharya (senior teacher) in the Shambhala lineage of compassionate bravery as taught by Tibetan Buddhist social visionaries Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche and Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. His essay “Buddhism and The Politics of Race” appeared in the collection Mindful Politics. His article “Making Friends with Ourselves,” from Dharma, Color, and Culture was selected for inclusion in the series The Best Buddhist Writing.

Arawana Hayashi

Arawana Hayashi

Co-founder of the Presencing Institute and creator of Social Presencing Theatre

Module » Exploring Diversity Using Social Presencing Theater

Social Presencing Theater is an innovative social art form developed by the Presencing Institute that draws upon a body-based, intuitive knowledge of oneself and others.

This workshop provides training in embodiment and Social Presencing Theater as it applies to leadership and social change. Workshop participants engage in mindfulness practices that increase awareness of the individual and social body. By heightening their sense of interpersonal connection, participants are better able to access shared knowing and collective creativity. The practices support an ability to facilitate groups and provide effective and compassionate leadership.

The use of non-verbal techniques to inquire into “stuck” situations in one’s personal and organizational life lead to surprising insights and possibilities. Social Presencing Theater heightens sensitivity to current experience and brings attention to shifts in the social or contextual field.

Drawing on the arts and contemplative traditions, Social Presencing Theater brings to the surface a clearer sense of the relationships, hidden dynamics, and emerging possibilities inherent in a team, organization or larger system. It allows co-creators in a given system to gain insight into the current situation, seeing potential opportunities for change and sets the ground for creative collective action.

Participants will learn to:

  • Recognize their implicit bias as an embodied feeling of liking, disliking, or not noticing specific individuals and structures
  • Make choices about how to respond to their environment, based on their understanding of bias
  • Identify the “felt sense” of structural power and oppression
  • Identify the spatial arrangements that empower some and marginalize others
  • Practice leadership as the activity of caring for the whole community
  • Acquire strategies for communicating care in an embodied way, across differences in identity and culture

Arawana Hayashi

Arawana Hayashi’s pioneering work as a choreographer, performer and educator is deeply sourced in collaborative improvisation. She co-created Social Presencing Theater for the Presencing Institute with founders Peter Senge and Otto Scharmer, also from the MIT Leadership Center.

She brings her background in the arts, meditation and social justice to creating “social presencing” that makes visible both current reality and emerging future possibilities. She has been Co-Director of the Dance Program at Naropa University, Boulder, CO; and founder-director of two contemporary dance companies in Cambridge. MA.

Arawana is an acharya (senior teacher) in Shambhala – a global network of meditation centers dedicated to applying mindfulness to “creating enlightened society.” She teaches both meditation and art based on bringing out the basic goodness of individuals, of relationships and of society.

Leticia Nieto, Psy.D., LMFT

Leticia Nieto, Psy.D., LMFT

Psychotherapist, dramatist, educator, and author of Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment

Module » Not All Differences Are Equal

Oppression interrupts a natural process of development that has liberation as its natural end. With a better understanding of true power, the range of possible responses to oppression, and the processes of human development, we can increase our ability to take action that liberates us all. Each human interaction can be viewed through the lenses of power, status, and rank, where the system of rank involves the two key social roles programmed into all of us, that of the overvalued and the undervalued groups. Most of us have a complex mixture of both memberships. Each role has a unique progression of skills that can be cultivated, from unconscious to increasingly conscious. Developmental processes provide an approach for appreciating both the challenge and necessity of outgrowing our embeddedness in the rank system, while recognizing our transpersonal unity.

Not all differences are equal. In our society, some characteristics automatically afford significant benefit while others lead to debilitating disadvantage. Our work, then, is to notice how our differences affect one another, not just individually but systemically. The Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment model illuminates how the dynamics of benefit and disadvantage play out in human interactions along multiple lines of difference. It can be easy to misread situations and compound suffering. We can move beyond political correctness to creating transformative environments that invite interactions that are skilled and attuned.

Participants will learn to:

  • Recognize the three layers of exchange in human interactions
  • Assess socially conditioned role-lock
  • Understand the liberatory skill progressions for advantaged and devalued groups

Leticia Nieto, Psy.D., LMFT

Leticia Nieto is a psychotherapist and educator with an emphasis in clinical psychology, human development, and expressive arts. Her book Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment: A Developmental Strategy to Liberate Everyone provides an analysis of the psychological dynamics of oppression and privilege. It offers readers ways to develop skills to promote social justice. Leticia is a Professor at Saint Martin’s University in the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program.

Leticia has been an active poet, dramatist, and performer since 1978. She has been a psychotherapist and trainer in anti-oppression and expressive techniques including psychodrama, playback theatre, and theatre of the oppressed since 1980. For her work in the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Program at Saint Martin’s University, Nieto was named Outstanding Faculty of the Year in 2005. She is also a member of the faculty of the European School of Classical Psychodrama in Mexico, and loves to sing.

Susan Skjei, Ph.D.

Susan Skjei, Ph.D.

Experienced executive, consultant, and coach; Director of the Authentic Leadership Center, Naropa University

Module » Creating a Culture of Mindfulness and Inclusivity in Your Organization

As leaders we all face challenging situations in which our authenticity, integrity, and courage are on the line. At times we may even feel overwhelmed, unable to think clearly or make important decisions. Mindfulness practices can intervene in this “fight or flight” reaction and help us come back to the hidden resources we have available to us in the present moment. Susan will share essential mindfulness practices that cultivate self-awareness and confidence in the moments that really matter.

Mindfulness can also help us access clarity and focus in the midst of challenging situations. Instead of being distracted by fleeting thoughts and emotional ups and downs, we can develop the capacity to sustain attention and connection and therefore engage in more effective interactions. This has a positive effect in the workplace overall. As we become more familiar with our own inner landscape, we begin to develop empathy and compassion for others. We also become more skilled at recognizing conflicts and responding to the emotional needs of the people around us.

These same leadership qualities can become the foundation of an inclusive organizational culture. In this experiential workshop, Susan will utilize a variety of participative methodologies to explore how we can bring mindfulness tools and methods into our own organizations to foster the cultures we want to create.

Participants will learn to:

  • Personal mindfulness practices that will help leaders remain centered and resilient in challenging moments
  • Mindful communication tools that leaders can use with their own teams to develop a culture of trust
  • Collaborative methods for leading mindful change that can help foster engagement and inclusion

Susan SkjeI, Ph.D.

Susan Skjei, Ph.D, PCC has worked with thousands of leaders in the US, Canada and Europe over the last 25 years to cultivate self-awareness and authenticity, strengthen relational skills, and effectively lead the changes they want to see in their organizations and in the world. Drawing on the disciplines of neuroscience, Buddhism, complexity science, organizational learning and leadership, she fosters high trust and engaging learning environments for diverse participants. Susan is a frequent speaker at conferences and has provided custom programs for healthcare, education, natural products and media, as well as government and nonprofit organizations.

Formerly a Vice President and Chief Learning Officer in a fortune 1000 company, Susan is currently the director of the Authentic Leadership Center at Naropa University. The center includes the acclaimed ALIA Institute as well as in-depth programs in Authentic Leadership and Mindfulness. The purpose of the center is to awaken leaders to their inherent human goodness and empower them to skillfully cultivate healthy organizations and communities. Susan is also an Acharya (senior teacher) in the Shambhala lineage and conducts retreats and leadership programs internationally.

Special Guest

Presentation » Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don't Agree with or Like or Trust

* Live-Stream Video Session

We’re trying to get something done that really matters to us. To do this we need to work with others. But these others include people we don’t agree with or like or trust, so working with them seems impossible—like collaborating with the enemy. What can we do?

International consultant Adam Kahane, whose work has been praised by Nobel Peace Prize winners Nelson Mandela and Juan Manuel Santos, has faced this challenge many times in working both on big issues, like economic restructuring, climate change, and civil war, and on ordinary issues within organizations and families. He has come to understand that everything we think we know about collaboration—that it requires a harmonious team that agrees on where it’s going and how it’s going to get there—is wrong. On the contrary, the only way to get things done with diverse others is to abandon harmony, agreement, and control and to learn to work with discord, experimentation, and genuine co-creation.

Kahane proposes a new approach to collaboration—stretch collaboration—that is built on this insight. He offers examples of how he’s helped people apply it in all kinds of tough situations throughout the world. This approach requires stepping forward with openness and commitment.

As the poet Antonio Machado suggests: “Walker, there is no path. The path is made by walking.”

As our societies have become more polarized and globalized and our organizations have become less hierarchical, more of us need to collaborate across more heterogeneous groups than ever before. This means that increasingly often we face situations where conventional collaboration does not work. Kahane’s book offers a proven and practical approach to getting things done in such complex and conflictual contexts. It could not be more timely.


Adam Kahane

Adam Kahane is a Director of Reos Partners, an international social enterprise that helps people move forward together on their most important and intractable issues. Adam is a leading organizer, designer and facilitator of processes through which business, government, and civil society leaders can work together to address such challenges. He has worked in more than fifty countries, in every part of the world, with executives and politicians, generals and guerrillas, civil servants and trade unionists, community activists and United Nations officials, clergy and artists. Adam is the author of Solving Tough Problems: An Open Way of Talking, Listening, and Creating New Realities, Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change, Transformative Scenario Planning: Working Together to Change the Future, and Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don’t Agree With or Like or Trust.

Adam has a B.Sc. in Physics (First Class Honours) from McGill University (Montreal), an M.A. in Energy and Resource Economics from the University of California (Berkeley), and an M.A. in Applied Behavioural Science from Bastyr University (Seattle). He has also studied negotiation at Harvard Law School and cello performance at Institut Marguerite-Bourgeoys. Adam and his wife Dorothy live in Montreal and Cape Town.

What Participants are Saying?

“I was impressed by the caliber of the faculty, the depth of the conversations, and the purposefulness of everyone involved.”

Helene Liu

The MasterMinds Group, Hong Kong

“My Naropa experience was one of the highlights of my year. I…get better at taking a breath and reminding myself to use the tools at my disposal instead of floundering around when something comes up.”

Judy Hatcher

Executive Director, Pesticide Action Network North America

“The Summer Leadership Intensive takes you into a different way of thinking, where you can see from new angles and be open to new possibilities. I always return with valuable skills and insights.”

Hazel A. Morrow-Jones

Associate Provost & Director, Women’s Policy Initiatives & The Women’s Place, Ohio State University

“What I’ve learned at the ALIA Institute has helped me empower my office staff and recognize what I do well as a physician, and what I could do better. I highly recommend it.”

Marc Parnes, MD

Event Schedule

Thursday, June 22 | Acknowledging Difference
Registration, Arrival: Please plan on arriving between 3pm and 6pm to check-in, register, and get settled. The program begins at 6pm with a welcome dinner.

Welcome Dinner: Gather for an evening of conversation and connection as we enter our inquiry with a family style dinner.

Friday, June 23 | Exploring Difference
Guided Movement: Start the day with a guided embodiment practice to wake up mind and body.

Breakfast (Cafeteria):

  • Meal cards are included in the price of registration
  • Resident participants receive a meal card for breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Commuter participants receive a meal card for lunch and dinner only

Introduction: Our first morning provides context and establishes the intention for the workshop, including interactive activities and a group meditation session.

Guided Mindfulness: Lead by a senior practitioner, this talk and meditation practice connects us with the basic sanity, courage and compassion in each of us. These sessions help us establish the ground for entering into the work of our day and beyond.

Lunch (Cafeteria): The same as for all meal times.

Modules (Part 1): Choose a module (participants will continue module part 1 and part 2)

Cross-Module Synthesis Discussion: These small groups (4-5 people) allow for dialogue and sharing with participants from across the modules.

Dinner (Cafeteria): The same as for all meal times.

Hosted Community Development: A fun, interactive evening of experiencing what it’s like to engage our differences as we work together.

Saturday, June 24 | Engaging Difference
Guided Movement: Start the day with a guided embodiment practice to wake up mind and body.

Breakfast (Cafeteria):

  • Meal cards are included in the price of registration
  • Resident participants receive a meal card for breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Commuter participants receive a meal card for lunch and dinner only

Special Guest: Adam Kahane (live stream presentation) – Collaborating with the Enemy: How to Work with People You Don’t Agree with or Like or Trust

Guided Mindfulness: Lead by a senior practitioner, this talk and meditation practice connects us with the basic sanity, courage and compassion in each of us. These sessions help us establish the ground for entering into the work of our day and beyond.

Faculty Team Process: Embodying the Diversity of our Social System. In this plenary session, Arawana Hayashi and Aftab Erfan lead us through an experience of mapping the Social Body of our society/community, its complexities, divisions and connection points. We go beyond intellectual and emotional forms of grappling with diversity and tap into our deeper knowing about the realities we live in. Through embodied and dialogic practices, silence and conversation, we let go of what we think we know about these issues, and let new insight and information come to the surface, and new movements to emerge. This reflective segment prepares the ground for answering the questions of what we should do to better address the challenges and opportunities of our diversity.

Lunch (Cafeteria): The same as for all meal times.

Modules (Part 2): Choose a module (participants will continue module part 1 and part 2)

Cross-Module Synthesis Discussion: These small groups (4-5 people) allow for dialogue and sharing with participants from across the modules.

Dinner (Cafeteria): The same as for all meal times.

Hosted Community Social: End the day with a hosted social event designed for casual interaction and a chance to enjoy the diversity of gifts in the group.

Sunday, June 25 | Celebrating Difference
Guided Movement: Start the day with a guided embodiment practice to wake up mind and body.

Breakfast (Cafeteria):

  • Meal cards are included in the price of registration
  • Resident participants receive a meal card for breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Commuter participants receive a meal card for lunch and dinner only

Guided Mindfulness: Lead by a senior practitioner, this talk and meditation practice connects us with the basic sanity, courage and compassion in each of us. These sessions help us establish the ground for entering into the work of our day and beyond.

Action Oriented Prototyping: As our time together draws to a close, the question is, “What’s next?” This is a time to clarify our personal next wise action and draw inspiration and guidance from each other to move our learning into action.

Lunch (Cafeteria): The same as for all meal times.

Taking Our Intentions Forward: A closing process will allow for integration and intention setting as we prepare to return to our communities.

Closing, departure: The program will be complete by 3pm.

Detailed Daily Breakdown

Thursday, June 22 | Acknowledging Difference
3:00 P.M. – Registration, Arrival
6:00 P.M. – Welcome Dinner

Friday, June 23 | Exploring Difference
6:30 A.M. – Guided Movement
7:00 A.M. – Breakfast
8:00 A.M. – Introduction
11:00 A.M. – Guided Mindfulness
12:00 P.M. – Lunch
1:30 P.M. – Modules: Part 1
4:45 P.M. – Cross-module Synthesis Discussion
5:30 P.M. – Dinner
7:00 P.M. – Hosted Community Development

Saturday, June 24 | Engaging Difference
6:30 A.M. – Guided Movement
7:00 A.M. – Breakfast
8:00 A.M. – Guided Mindfulness
9:30 A.M. – Faculty Team Process
12:00 P.M. – Lunch
1:30 P.M. – Modules: Part 2
4:45 P.M. – Cross-module Synthesis Discussion
5:30 P.M. – Dinner
7:00 P.M. – Hosted Community Social

Sunday, June 25 | Celebrating Difference
6:30 A.M. – Guided Movement
7:00 A.M. – Breakfast
8:00 A.M. – Guided Mindfulness
9:00 A.M. – Action Oriented Prototyping
12:00 A.M. – Lunch
1:30 P.M. – Taking Our Intentions Forward
3:00 P.M. – Closing, Departure

Accommodations & Travel

We encourage you to stay on campus – we’ll have evening community events and it strengthens the overall experience.

Your registration fee includes the entire Intensive and all meals

  • Thursday night, June 22nd through Sunday afternoon, June 25th.

Your accommodation is an extra fee.

  • We are using a university dormitory.
  • You will be able to reserve and pay for accommodations when you register.

Accommodations are in the PLU’s newer South Hall (same as in ALIA 2014)
There are two choices:

A “Double” is $240 (total) for 3 nights

  • Four people share a pod arrangement
  • Each person has their own bedroom
  • Two persons share one of the two private bathrooms
  • Four persons share a living room/kitchen area joining the two pairs

A “Single” is $300 (total) for 3 nights

  • One person has their own bedroom and private bathroom

Included in your accommodation fee are sheets, a pillow, a blanket, and towels for your stay (some extra pillows and light blankets will be available upon requests). You may wish to bring a thicker towel, reading light and any other transportable comforts that you feel you will need.

Address
Pacific Lutheran University
12180 Park Avenue South
Tacoma, Washington 98447
Directions

Traveling to PLU

  • The campus can be reached from I-5 (North or South) at Exit 127 and head East on Highway 512; continuing for 2 miles. Take WA-7/Pacific Ave exit; turn right on Pacific Ave S for 1 mile; turn right on Garfield St. for two blocks.
  • Leaving from SeaTac airport you will travel south for about 45 minutes. The campus is about 15-20 minutes south of Tacoma proper.
  • The following are options for transportation to the Campus.

Public Bus Transport available from the airport (SeaTac Airport)
Call for prices and availability for the following local transport companies

Registration Details

Leadership Intensive Tuition: $995
Early-Bird: $895 (Until May 1)
Last-Minute Pricing: $1,050 (After June 23rd)

Register Now

Call 303-245-4723 | [email protected]

Leadership Intensive

June 22-25, 2017

3-Day Live Workshop
6 Faculty/Guests Speakers
Peer Group Social Learning
Experiential Exercises

  • Price includes all meals
  • Accommodation are extra; double and single rooms available
  • Additional discounts available for groups, members, partners and sponsors.
  • Partial scholarships available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend – apply here!
  • Donate to the scholarship fund by clicking “tickets” here.
  • Questions, contact us at (303) 245-4723 or email [email protected]
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